The big reason that D.C. makes the cut is population density. The entire district is basically an urban area, which leads to higher insurance rates. According to Census information, D.C has a population density of 11,020 people per square mile. While this number is certainly smaller than New York City, which clocks in at 28,256 people, it puts it well above other large cities, such as Houston and even Los Angeles.
Each insurance company evaluates personal factors in its own way, and they keep their methods as hidden as possible. So we can’t tell you which company puts high value in your occupation or emphasizes a clean driving history more than others. But to help you get going, we can show you a car insurance rate comparison for the same hypothetical driver and car, using average rates from across the country.
Heightened losses in recent years have led to a 7.2% rate hike across the 10 largest auto insurers in 2017. This rate increase followed a year in which eight of the 10 largest auto insurers reported a negative underwriting profit. In the table below, a combined loss ratio of more than 100% indicates the company incurred more in losses and expenses than it earned in premiums.

Naturally, insurance companies use your driving past as an indicator of how you will drive in the future. It can be difficult to find affordable car insurance if you have a checkered driving history. While it’s very unlikely you will find an insurance company that won’t increase your premium after an at-fault accident or other violation, the degree of the rate increase will vary by company. Let’s compare rate increases for some common violations across major insurance companies.
The cost of insurance is on the rise: the price for auto insurance rose 3.6% between 2011 and 2012, and 3.1% for homeowners and renter’s insurance, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In fact, auto liability insurance premiums alone have been increasing by 2.8% annually for the past three years. This makes choosing the right coverage and provider all the more crucial to save money without sacrificing important aspects of coverage.
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