Natural disasters inflicted huge losses on insurers in 2018. Preliminary reports from the California Department of Insurance estimate that the November 2018 wildfires caused more than $123 million in auto and nonresidential insurance claims. Additionally, hurricanes Michael and Florence, which pummeled the Southeast in the fall of 2018, caused between $7.7 billion and $14.6 billion in insurance losses.

The combination of record-setting natural disasters, an uptick in distracted-driving accidents and the increasing prevalence of tech-loaded vehicles that are expensive to repair mean insurers are likely to raise rates in 2019. These factors, coupled with the fact that insurers have failed to turn an underwriting profit in recent years—despite year-over-year rate increases—indicate that drivers will pay more for car insurance in the coming year.
The cost of insurance is on the rise: the price for auto insurance rose 3.6% between 2011 and 2012, and 3.1% for homeowners and renter’s insurance, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In fact, auto liability insurance premiums alone have been increasing by 2.8% annually for the past three years. This makes choosing the right coverage and provider all the more crucial to save money without sacrificing important aspects of coverage.
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