I am glad to see USAA at the bottom; but it should not be on the list at all. I am currently going through a claim with them (total loss, I got rear ended, pushed into the car in front of me and they hit the car in front of them; not at fault). I have all correspondence recorded and proof of them lying to me, and using made up regulations to justify it. When asked for the reference for said regulations, I am ignored. I have been throwing WAC at them, quote after quote as to how they are being unruly. This was in December, it is now April and they have YET to give me a valuation report in compliance with WAC. I will be more than happy to provide a copy of our correspondence (with PII edited, obviously), proving how bad USAA is at customer service and how willing they are to break the rules if it benefits them. Email me if you want to see it. I finally had enough and contacted the Washington State Insurance Commissioner; USAA has until the middle of this month to respond to them… We will see what happens next.
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As it currently stands with Texas, in the event of an accident, there’s a one in seven chance that the other driver won’t be insured. Unless you’ve purchased uninsured/underinsured motorist (UM/UIM) coverage, that’s money out of your pocket. Texas’s minimum requirements also don’t account for comprehensive coverage, which you’ll definitely want to take into consideration, since the state ranks first for monetary losses from “catastrophes” like hail storms and hurricanes.

Combined loss ratio and direct written premium information for private auto insurance was gathered from S&P Global, a financial data resource for the insurance industry. Rate increase figures were obtained from RateFilings.com and represent a weighted average across the 50 states and the District of Columbia based on written private auto insurance premiums.
On average, an at-fault property damage accident will raise your premium by an average of $612 per year. Because most insurance providers will charge you for three years after an accident, this $612 increase equates to more than $1,800 in total fees. If you’re thinking of filing a claim, consider the overall cost of the claim versus what the claim would cost to pay out of pocket. Compare this $1,837 penalty — plus your deductible (if applicable) — to the out-of-pocket expense. While this is nice information to know before filing a claim, it won’t help if you’ve already filed a claim. If you have an at-fault accident on your insurance history, consider USAA or State Farm.
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