Now flash forward present day. Last month I had a wreck. It was not my fault. I called USAA to get my rental covered because the cop wouldn’t give me the @ fault driver’s info said I had to wait for the police report. USAA informs me that I don’t have rental. Excuse me 3 months ago when I added collision I told you add rental & you said you would. USAA claims I did not tell them that, but I know I did because Roadside made it but not rental? Now mind you my Escalade is totalled. The frame is warped among many other things. I’m not @ fault & USAA (my own insurance company) tries to screw me? (The @ fault driver’s insurance company is someone I’ve never heard of but it’s not USAA) The adjustor says not totalled we’ll settle for 10Gs…. no I’m not settling for 10Gs on 50G+ truck especially with a warped frame NO WAY!! I’ve lost major retail value & nobody will buy it with the carfax that’s attached to it now.
But liability coverage levels come in threes — you’ll probably see something like 50/100/50 up to 250/500/250 in typical policies. You can think of these limits like: individual injuries / total injuries / property damage. Insurers are a little more technical, calling them bodily injury liability, total bodily injury liability and physical damage liability.
There is a case to be made for getting just comprehensive and not collision insurance, even if your car is not valuable. Comprehensive covers you for a lot more perils than does collision--including, most importantly, against theft. Regardless of the value of your car, having it stolen is a major inconvenience. Even if your car is worth only $2,000 at the time of the theft, and your insurer gives you $1,500, that sum would go a long way in buying yourself a new vehicle. As we discuss in more detail below, comprehensive insurance generally costs no more than $200 per year, so a $1,500 reimbursement would make the coverage valuable.
If you’ve ever compared car insurance rates, you know how many options are available. Depending on a variety of individual rating factors, certain companies will price your insurance differently. You could end up paying more by choosing the wrong company or failing to compare enough companies. We've outlined the factors that go into your car insurance premiums, as well as some tips for how to find the best possible rates. Let’s get started.
Additional living expenses, or loss-of-use coverage is typically a fixed amount – 20% of your dwelling coverage. However, if you live in an area prone to wildfires or hurricanes, it's worth checking with your insurer to see if they offer higher coverage limits in the event a catastrophe forces you from your home for an extended period. Additional living expenses can add up, so it may be worth the added peace of mind to increase this coverage component.

At InsuranceQuotes, we want to make buying and using insurance a more straightforward experience. Get started with our free quote finder to instantly find and compare the latest quotes for auto, home, renters, life, health, or business coverage in your area. If you’re unsure about the finer details of policies, coverage limitations or claims, check out the IQ Insurance Library’s comprehensive insurance guides and subject-specific articles written by our team of independent insurance experts.

×